SpaceX rocket narrowly misses UFO collision on journey to space station

The recent SpaceX launch experienced two near-misses during the trip to the ISS (SpaceX)
The recent SpaceX launch experienced two near-misses during the trip to the ISS (SpaceX)

Footage captured during the recent manned SpaceX launch shows the moment the rocket nearly collided with a piece of space debris.

The piece of floating matter flew was captured on camera during the livestream of the journey to dock with the International Space Station (ISS).

It actually came from the rocket itself just 12 minutes into the flight.

The item was a piece of debris from the front capsule that broke off and was propelled to the back of the craft.

In fact, this was the first of two near-misses on the same voyage.

The piece of space debris came from the rocket itself (SpaceX)
The piece of space debris came from the rocket itself (SpaceX)

And while the four astronauts on board weren’t bothered by the first – the second did involve a bit of a scare.

Six hours later the astronauts were told to ‘buckle up’ when another object was picked up hurtling towards them.

‘The Nasa/SpaceX team was informed of the possible conjunction by US Space Command,’ Nasa spokesperson Kelly Humphries told Futurism.

This video grab image courtesy of NASA TV shows (From L) ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Thomas Pesquet, NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough, and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, inside the capsule at launch pad at Launch Complex 39A ahead of the Crew-2 mission, April 23, 2021, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. - SpaceX is set to launch its third crew to the International Space Station early April 23, 2021, reusing a rocket and crew capsule in a human mission for the first time. The Crew-2 mission blasts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:49 am Eastern Time (0949 GMT), after being delayed a day by adverse weather along the flight path. (Photo by Agustin PAULLIER / various sources / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT
ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet, NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough, and JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, inside the capsule at launch pad at Launch Complex 39A ahead of the Crew-2 mission (AFP)

‘The object being tracked is classified as ‘unknown.”

There was apparently no time to perform an avoidance maneuver and the astronauts were told to put on their pressurized suits and brace for an impact.

Crew 2 member JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide of Japan is embraced by his compatriot Crew 1 member JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi as he and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet of France are welcomed as they arrive aboard the International Space Station, after docking SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule obiting the earth April 24, 2021 in a still image from video. NASA TV via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
The astronauts made it to the space station (SpaceX)

‘The possibility of the conjunction came so close to the closest approach time that there wasn’t time to compute and execute a debris avoidance maneuver with confidence, so the SpaceX team elected to have the crew don their pressure suits out of an abundance of caution,’ Humphries said.

Thankfully, the collision didn’t happen and the astronauts reached the ISS safely.

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